Browsing Category: 60+ minutes to MultiDay

Braised Chickpea Chard Coconut Meal
Translated for Backpacking!

Components:
1 c dehydrated braised chickpea chard coconut & couscous
1.5 c hot boiled water
About 35 minutes sit time, stir after 20*

Bored with your dehydrated backpacking meal rotation?
This just in: braised coconut chickpea & spinach recipe from The Kitchn works out as a dehydrated camp meal! Completed my trial of it yesterday with a taste test with some old friends.** Clockwise from top left: in my friend Alessandra‘s dehydrator, vacuum sealed +couscous (stored in freezer for optimum dryness while I was out galavanting), mid-hydration, ready to eat! Special thanks to Alessandra for loaning the dehydrator, and Torey for pointing me to the original recipe years ago while we were waiting for our S.O.s to finish the Vermont Beast.

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Empanada-rama at Stephanie’s: I wish I could take a picture of this smell!

 

Empanada:

The name comes from the verb empanar, meaning to wrap or coat in bread … Empanadas have their origins in Galicia (Spain) and Portugal. They first appeared in Medieval Iberia during the time of the Moorish invasions. A cookbook published in Catalan in 1520 mentions empanadas filled with seafood among its recipes of Catalan, Italian, French, and Arabian food. It is believed that empanadas and the very similar calzones are both derived from the Arabic meat-filled pies, samosas. The dish was carried to Latin America and the Philippines by Spanish colonists, where they remain very popular to this day.

Majura Primary School in Watson, Australia +portions confirmed in NY Times article +The Spruce.com*

A dish truly borne of our collective human heritage!

Proxy guest post, because my friend Stephanie says she doesn’t like writing about herself. As one who loves all dough-wrapped dishes, she hosted the empanada-rama.

This recipe for dough won out:
Thanks, Laylita! How to Make Empanada Dough for Baking Continue Reading

Pro-Tip Tuesday: Free Scallion Starts!

Do you wish you didn’t have to go to the store every time you needed green onions (a.k.a. scallions)?

Next time you chop a bunch of ’em to cook, save the bottom bits -the part with the roots- and plop them in a jar with a little bit of water in the bottom. Change the water every day or so and watch them grow! I’ve gradually moved mine into the planter boxes on my patio over time (especially in the summer months), but I hear you can also just leave them in a glass with water. Voila, now you have green onions in the future, and didn’t even need to buy any seeds. Advice: don’t leave the same water in there too long or it can start to rot.

Day 3 of scallions in a glass: look! They’re reaching for the water!

I felt inspired to share this after my friend Michelle expressed surprise at seeing me with this trick. Apparently, the internet’s covered it. However, I offer links to bonus content for other allium-related info for your entertainment. Continue Reading

Wellness Wednesday:
What 2017 Goals Do You Have?

Warning to new parents: this post may stir up your rage nerve, as it involves talk of sleep.

With the new year comes a feeling of renewed opportunities. Even if you weren’t making up new year’s resolutions, your friends might be talking about theirs and getting you thinking. I also have a few who eschew the term ‘resolution’ and prefer to think of ‘goals’. So, in deference to them..

This January, I’m attempting a goal to finally fix up my sleep habits, which currently consist of going to sleep too late, then waking up kind of early anyway. It’s been about a two-year slide into staying up later and later, between 10:30pm and 1:30am. Current target: 7.5-8 hours of sleep. Besides, I kind of feel like I’ve tried plenty of food and exercise-related goals and this will be an interesting change of pace. I’ll try to check in each Wednesday this month for a recap of how it’s gone. Step 1 in increased self-discipline: get next week’s “Wellness Wednesday” notes online before Thursday!

I’m going to try to tackle one primary thing each month (provided previous month’s goal is met) with an overall theme of more self-discipline. Last year’s “read more” goal went well for the list of books I started with, but fizzled in momentum mid-year.

What are you resolving to shift in your life in 2017?

Inspiration: hop on over to my fellow Minnesotan and food-related blogger Lee Hersch’s Fit Foodie Finds for other ideas on getting more healthy!

For those with small children who tenaciously still red this:

Any lessons learned or reflections from sleep training your kids, that you think could transfer here?

Food-Related Podcasts Worth A Listen

Happy New Year!

If, like me, you have been cocooning for the winter and don’t feel like leaving the house,* here are some of my favorite food podcasts. The overall theme appears to be stories on food and its origins, and how it connects us.

Gravy: the Southern Foodways Alliance has been putting out some really exciting stories over there, exploring stories and histories of food from different cultures living in the United States that traditionally haven’t had a loud voice in the mainstream.

The Sporkful: funny, down to earth. “The Sporkful isn’t for foodies, it’s for eaters.”

Gastropod: food with a side of science. Heard their oyster episode just as I was putting finishing touches on my post about going to Taylor Shellfish on a road trip. I’ve really enjoyed their stuff.

Racist Sandwich: lives in the intersection between food, race, gender and class, and shares some very frank perspectives.

On the Radar:

Food Without Borders: Food writer Sari Kamin speaks with guests on how food helps connect them to their past, ease potential conflict across cultures and strengthen the future. She also explores the immigrant experience in the U.S. today.
Food is the New Rock: every week Zach Brooks talks music with a chef, or food with a musician.
Food for Thought: stories related to food in Seattle, under the NPR umbrella.

Heritage Radio Network: the only online food station.

Honorable Mention:
The Splendid Table: American Public Media’s classic show on food.
Taste of the Past: with all the time spent listening to the ones above, this one doesn’t get my ears as much, but still makes it on the list.

 

Do you have a favorite food-related podcast that’s not listed here?

Please post in the comments and share, or tweet me @FoodtheWongWay.

Photo by Patrick Breitenbach.

*Exceptions: snowscapades, and holiday travel.

Oke Poke

Editor’s note: for the purposes of this post, all words that end with the suffix “oke” should be pronounced or more likely internally read as “okay”.

Guest blog brought to you by marriage.

Left coast living will bring you to Hawaii if you are of the means or the miles to get there. East coast has quick access to Europe and I guess the Caribbean and Newfoundland, but we get the tiny volcanic islands. Upon recommendation of my cubicle-mate, I decided to try and enjoy some Poke during a recent visit to Kauai. A few foursquare searches later, I settled on Pono Market. No joke (please see editor’s note), the poke was delicious, and we ended up going back again prior to departing the island. The final meal was garnished with a bit of sadness due to the knowledge that I would not be able to reproduce this dance of flavors again upon returning to the Pac.

 

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Bank Your DIY Holiday Gift Game with..
Beeswax Coconut Candles

One of these days I will finally sort through my reflections from hiking Sahale Arm and seeing a Glacier up close, or adventures in the Catskill Mountains of New York, but in the mean time, this:

The days are getting shorter, the weather’s getting crisper early in the morning. School supply ads reign supreme on live television between sports games. Before you know it, it’ll be Fall, and then Winter, and you might find yourself scrambling to put together a gift for that office party exchange, or family get-together where everyone draws a number from a hat. Well..

Do you have lots of leftover expired coconut oil?

No no, I mean LOTS.

Do you have a weakness for collecting empty containers your spouse/housemate/talking cat keeps suggesting you recycle, but perhaps they are the classy-looking “biscuit” tins you brought back from London last November, and they make you nostalgic for your travels to the the land of tea time, so you keep saying you’ll make candles with them?

Primary inspiration from internet research:
I did some other research on soy wax, and paraffin wax and decided beeswax was my preferred option, as I try to avoid ingesting processed soy for myself and paraffin is a petroleum byproduct, so it strikes me as a little odd to be breathing either in. See citations at bottom of post for more. Mad props to my co-conspirator Jillian who balanced out my OCD-craziness with wingin’ it like a boss, plus ensuring I didn’t burn my house down in the process somehow.
Amass your supplies, pioneer!
Amass your supplies, pioneer!

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Tricking Yourself into Exercise:
Recipe for an Active Day on Two Wheels with City Fruit

Apple trees in Meridian Park, approximately 100 years old. Netted by City Fruit to protect fruit from pests.

I really wanted you to know this:

Apples most likely originated in Kazakhstan from the Malus sieversii and brought over to America with European colonists then became a part of American culture with a little help from Mr. Appleseed himself, John Chapman. Around the turn of the 19th century, Johnny Appleseed bought some apple seeds from a Pennsylvania cider mill and headed to the Midwest to develop his orchards. At the time, the Homestead Act required settlers to plant 50 apple trees within the first year of holding their land and soon the apples, along with the settlers, began to establish their roots in America.
Layla Eplett, Scientific American: Food Matters

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Radish Cakes

蘿蔔糕 (Luo Bo Gao)!

A super-processed food recipe! Special exceptions must be made for once-a-year-events. Happy lunar new year! Special thanks to my mama, and to my co-conspirator Sarah, for providing her grandma-made childhood memories and decisive nature to help with quality assurance, decision-making, and even loaning me a steamer. Thanks also to my fellow food-obsessed friend Candace who gave me a tip on the rice flour type, and Angel Wong of Angel Wong’s Kitchen for her nice tutorial video that (a)confirmed the preferred rice flour type, and (b)filled in a few gaps in specifics for the recipe procedure. Note: another reason to try this labor-intensive recipe at home: lately when I go to some Chinese restaurants, they’ve sprinkled their radish cake with bits of shrimp so I can’t eat it unless I want to risk anaphylactic shock.

The finished product: take 2 post freezing and thawing.
The finished product: take 2 post freezing and thawing.

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