Browsing Category: Food-Related Entertainment

Friendly Friday:
Instant Pot – Virtually Instant, Really!

Spaghetti and meat made via Instant Pot by Tanya

Recently, I had a chance to visit my fellow Minnesotan friend Tanya, her spouse Justin, and their daughter Mabel in Portland. They graciously had me over for dinner, and I got to see a demo of the Instant Pot. Apparently she was so excited about it she bought a second one when it was on sale on Amazon. My friend Candace in San Francisco had previously bothered messaging me about this device as a sped up way to make radish cakes, so it seemed only right that I listen to the universe’s repeated prodding to investigate this gadget.

Tanya said I could post the video despite her self-consciousness if I did an Instant Pot post, so here we go. Check out super-mobile Mabel! I wish I could take a picture of the smell

Continue Reading

Friendly Friday: Sari Kamin’s Food Without Borders

There’s a new food podcast out, add it to your list, friends!

Sari Kamin started putting out Food Without Borders last month, brought to you by the only online food station Heritage Radio Network. Sari previously hosted ‘The Morning After,” a fun show about the restaurant industry, and felt inspired to create Food Without Borders to do something more meaningful.

I think food can be a very powerful tool for affecting people’s opinions and understanding of cultures beyond their own. I’m lucky to live in New York: a melting pot of a city where we have every type of food available to us and for the most part, folks are pretty tolerant of one another. This is no coincidence. When you eat each other’s food, the fear of the unknown or “the other” is often mitigated. It’s my hope that with Food Without Borders, there’s an opportunity to hear from some of the people cooking food (often behind the scenes) and that can potentially assuage some misunderstandings of who immigrants are.

Sari Kamin: culinary ethnographer, storyteller, eater, and Master’s graduate of NYU’s Food Studies Program

 

You may find Episode 2 with Manal Kahi especially interesting. It features Eat Offbeat, which delivers authentic and home-style ethnic meals conceived, prepared and delivered by refugees resettled in NYC. You might also enjoy Episode 4 with Fany Gerson, author of “My Sweet Mexico,” featuring frozen treats and sweets of Mexico. She shares her experience of how Mexican ice cream is traditionally made, touches on the impact of free trade (or lack thereof) on ingredients for a small business, interesting contrasts in people’s price expectations of different kinds of cuisine, and doing good for your community as a small for-profit business.

Check out the full list of food podcasts now posted under the Adventure section of Food the Wong Way’s navigation bar.

Got a food podcast you love and want to share with the world?

Write me in the comments, or send me a tweet @FoodtheWongWay.

Singapore: Hawker Centre Crash Course

Singapore is famous for its food culture, and although there are certainly high-end top-dollar restaurants with 10-course menus that would charm the foodiest ex-pat executive, the heart of that food culture lives in the local hawker centres.
Street food is a common cultural institution throughout the world, but has a special place in Southeast Asia in particular as the dominant working-class cuisine and in Singapore’s case primary meal option. The hawker centres themselves are the result of a typically Singaporean government effort in the 1970’s to improve food safety and keep an ever-increasing army of food hawkers from blocking traffic. The government built and maintains the cavernous markets themselves, and administers licensing and health codes. Despite this standardization, the hawker centre is still a vibrant part of the local culture and a wonderfully chaotic den of unexpected delights to western palates and challenges to preconceptions about “eating out”.

Tekka Centre, Singapore. Photo by Mike Borchert.

The centres are organized as long lines of narrow, no-frills stalls, each operated by a different vendor, each with their own specialties and styles. Although the cuisines tend to be dominated by the ethnicity of the surrounding neighborhood, it’s still a grab-bag of curries, dumplings, soups, hot pots, noodles, satay, fruit juices, and everything else that’s taken root in this culinary crossroads. Continue Reading

The Tapas of Al Andalus in Spain

A guest post by Karl:

Besides the amazing architecture of Al Andalus (the name of southern Spain during the times of the Islamic rule from ~700 – 1492, the area now known as Andalusia), the area is also known for tapas.

Tapas
Tapas are generally served in most bars and restaurants.  Some only serve tapas, and are known as a tapas bar.  With each drink that you order, you get small bites of food that come with the drink.  This is tapas.  I described it to others as a Spanish dim sum while drinking.  It’s a whole culture in Spain.  And it’s fantastic.

The type of tapas that come with your drinks can vary widely.  From the very basic potato chips with your beer to a small plate of calamari with your sangria.

Continue Reading

Friendly Friday:
2017 Living Breath Indigenous Foods and Ecological Knowledge Symposium

Last Friday was The Living Breath of wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ: Indigenous Foods and Ecological Knowledge Symposium. Folks from afar had made it to the University of Washington campus, including youth leadership from tribes as far away as NE Alaska.*

Inside the main room of the Intellectual House.

If you’re interested in advancing your knowledge in food movements, or advancing equity, there’s exciting work afoot from the folks in this space. Continue Reading

Friendly Friday: Introducing the Bizarro Tumblr, a Look Behind the Scenes

My friend Amy asked me when I was in Minnesota once, “do you ever make recipes that don’t turn out?”  and that spurred me starting a collection of fail/disappointment pictures. These have been deposited here as a stream, and has started to include situations I think funny.

You know, we’re all human, and we might as well admit it online, right?

I hope it makes you laugh. Let me know yes or no on that.

Tumblr snapshot

Future posts may also just include general behind-the-scenes tidbits, but you’ll just have to keep watching to find oot.

Going Home
Taiwan Adventures 1

Dear reader,
I’m trying something different this time with the writing. Let me know how it goes. Thanks!
Y

Belonging is a funny thing. As an Asian American kid growing up in Minnesota, I just wanted to be like everyone else I knew. My mother (born in Taiwan) persistently spoke to me in Chinese despite my brother and I coming home from school and responding in English for about ..twelve years. My parents sent me to Chinese language school on Saturday mornings. Despite being a good student on weekdays, come Saturday morning, I would just put down all the words I’d crammed for the quiz Friday night, wistfully think of the cartoons on tv I was missing while in class, then get on with my day.* Perhaps this allowed me to continue pretending I would grow up to be 6 feet tall, blond-haired and blue-eyed, with Scandinavian features when I grew up (it’s Minnesota, people look like that).

This April, an opportunity came up for me to go to Taiwan. Unlike last Fall, this one worked with my schedule and current obligations and seemed a good chance to go explore places where my mother grew up. It would be my first time back in 16 years. I say “back,” but honestly, I’ve been to Taiwan three times in my life: Continue Reading

Friendly Friday:
Is Koji the New Cool Kid Coming to Your Kitchen?

When is fusion food a good idea? Seems worth a try, especially in the case of Koji!

In this week’s installment of Friendly Friday: shoutout to one of my favorite podcasts for their inspiration-sparking episode this week, Gastropod:

Listen: Meet Koji, Your New Favorite Fungus (Gastropod)

Read: The Science of Koji – Cook’s Science (by Gastropod co-producer C. Graber)

Try: Koji- Cured Grilled Salmon Recipe (Saveur Magazine)

I find this especially a propo, since I’ve been getting into different kinds of non-refrigeration experiments, like pickles, adobo, and sourdough starter. It’s a great way to save money, food, and explore parts of our heritage tied to non-electric food preservation.

Have you tried Koji or other new fermentation-related foods?

Contact me or comment below to share your adventures and delight!

Blog News: How to Get Food the Wong Way, Right Away?

What do you call some one who works on contract for a scribe? A sub-scriber!

A yuk yuk yuk yuk yuk. How do you get Food the Wong Way posts right away? A short bit of blog news here: you can now subscribe to get email alerts via the ‘Subscribe!’ option on this main page. On full web browser: it’s to the right, below the ‘Hello’ section. On mobile: it’ll be below that ‘Hello’ section at the very bottom of your browser. I promise not to sell your info to a spam list.

Little-known secret: not everything that goes up here goes up on Facebook/Twitter/Instagram accounts, and some times what does go up did not go up right away. Thanks for putting up with my corny jokes. ;D I made that one up myself, just for you.