Browsing Category: Good for Potlucks

Empanada-rama at Stephanie’s: I wish I could take a picture of this smell!

 

Empanada:

The name comes from the verb empanar, meaning to wrap or coat in bread … Empanadas have their origins in Galicia (Spain) and Portugal. They first appeared in Medieval Iberia during the time of the Moorish invasions. A cookbook published in Catalan in 1520 mentions empanadas filled with seafood among its recipes of Catalan, Italian, French, and Arabian food. It is believed that empanadas and the very similar calzones are both derived from the Arabic meat-filled pies, samosas. The dish was carried to Latin America and the Philippines by Spanish colonists, where they remain very popular to this day.

Majura Primary School in Watson, Australia +portions confirmed in NY Times article +The Spruce.com*

A dish truly borne of our collective human heritage!

Proxy guest post, because my friend Stephanie says she doesn’t like writing about herself. As one who loves all dough-wrapped dishes, she hosted the empanada-rama.

This recipe for dough won out:
Thanks, Laylita! How to Make Empanada Dough for Baking Continue Reading

What is that?! How to try a new vegetable

Novelty is the spice of life. Oh wait, that’s variety. Well, I like novelty..

Step 1: Walk inside a grocery store, bodega or your favorite market.

Step 2: Spot a piece of produce that makes your brain itch with curiosity. In this case: this delightfully geometric vegetable next to the cauliflower.

Face-off: cauliflower vs romanesco. Winter is here (in other words, these are in season).
Magic sauce: also known as butter and some other stuff.

Continue Reading

Food-Related Podcasts Worth A Listen

Happy New Year!

If, like me, you have been cocooning for the winter and don’t feel like leaving the house,* here are some of my favorite food podcasts. The overall theme appears to be stories on food and its origins, and how it connects us.

Gravy: the Southern Foodways Alliance has been putting out some really exciting stories over there, exploring stories and histories of food from different cultures living in the United States that traditionally haven’t had a loud voice in the mainstream.

The Sporkful: funny, down to earth. “The Sporkful isn’t for foodies, it’s for eaters.”

Gastropod: food with a side of science. Heard their oyster episode just as I was putting finishing touches on my post about going to Taylor Shellfish on a road trip. I’ve really enjoyed their stuff.

Racist Sandwich: lives in the intersection between food, race, gender and class, and shares some very frank perspectives.

On the Radar:

Food Without Borders: Food writer Sari Kamin speaks with guests on how food helps connect them to their past, ease potential conflict across cultures and strengthen the future. She also explores the immigrant experience in the U.S. today.
Food is the New Rock: every week Zach Brooks talks music with a chef, or food with a musician.
Food for Thought: stories related to food in Seattle, under the NPR umbrella.

Heritage Radio Network: the only online food station.

Honorable Mention:
The Splendid Table: American Public Media’s classic show on food.
Taste of the Past: with all the time spent listening to the ones above, this one doesn’t get my ears as much, but still makes it on the list.

 

Do you have a favorite food-related podcast that’s not listed here?

Please post in the comments and share, or tweet me @FoodtheWongWay.

Photo by Patrick Breitenbach.

*Exceptions: snowscapades, and holiday travel.

Chef Kyle Wisner’s Lunch Break Demo @the Book Larder

One overcast Monday morning, I ventured over to the Book Larder, a community cookbook store on Fremont Ave of Seattle. I’ve ridden past there many a time by bike and by bus, and always meant to go. Finally, I found time and managed to sign up for classes a few days ahead.

Note: if you are scrambling for last minute gifts for people who love to eat, cooking classes may be a good option that ships instantaneously! Be mindful to check if it’s a demo, or hands-on, as that may matter depending on how much your loved one likes to cook (i.e. more hands-on for those who are into working with their hands, more demo for those who are more into eating the final product). Go ahead, click away from this post, I won’t mind.. 🙂

Chef Kyle Wisner did a delicious demo for the group on some straightforward recipes for swift home cooking, perfect for a hectic holiday season. Below are some recipes he shared, editorial commentary is my own.

Pork Roast

Ingredients:

Center-cut pork roast
Enough za’atar spices to cover surface of the roast
kosher salt to preference

Tools: oven, , baking dish, meat thermometer

Steps:

  1. Salt the roast “aggressively”, like any steak or other big cut of meat, rest the roast out to room temperature before roasting. Preheat oven to 400 (or 425F if your oven is weak sauce).
  2. Cover surface in za’atar spice.
  3. Bake roast in oven until it reaches an internal temp of 120F, approximately 18-30 minutes. It will likely still be a little pink in the middle, but the juices will disperse back and finish as you let the roast rest a while before serving.
  4. Optional: bonus points for drawing a depiction of “aggressively salting.”

Continue Reading

Pro-Tip Tuesday: Buy the Oranges, and Make Macaroons too!

Pro-Tip of the Day:
Have you been buying those boxes and bags of oranges on sale at the store?

Next time pick up a bag of coconut flakes and sliced almonds, and you can make this quick, yummy (gluten-free) byproduct treat from in-season fruit!

Just remember to take 30 seconds to grate the rind off before you eat the orange, and you’ll have enough for this recipe. Note: try not to take too much of the white parts (the pith), that’s bitter. Continue Reading

Pro-Tip Tuesday: Tea Infuser + Dessert Dusting

How can you dust powdered sugar on your holiday desserts without making a mess, AND conserve the left over for the next round?

Try a tea infuser! Here’s the shortest video I’ve ever intentionally made, lol.

I’m pretty sure even if you don’t have one with an easy handle and all, it’ll still work neater than a gigantor flour sieve. Then you can return the rest to the bag! You know how I hate food waste..

For the delicious (although blurry) gluten-free chocolate cake in the limelight of this video, Continue Reading

Cucumber Salad (Sunomono)

Bonus entry!
I had leftover cucumber from that tzatziki (and leftover tzatziki too, but that’s a different puzzle), so I figured I’d make some delicious but simple cucumber salad, Japanese style. The recipe I’ve been using since 2007 is from this website with cucumber recipe files.

I halved it for my purposes tonight, but this is the full portion for ingredients below:

  • 1 cucumber, peeled, thinly sliced
  • salt (haven’t found I feel there is much added value with salting it)
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 2 tsp rice vinegar
  • 1/4 tsp grated ginger
  • 1/2 tsp sesame oil

CucumberSaladIngredients_@0131007

Thankfully, the 30-day reduced sugar challenge I was doing with co-workers in October is over, so I am adding sugar to my heart’s (small) desire! I am either in denial, or I didn’t have that bad a sugar addiction as the books say most people have. I actually did quite badly last month, gaming the rules I was following, and the limit of 1 sugar item (like dessert) each weekend day actually turned into a quota, which I don’t think I was previously following. But enough of a tangent, back to the task:

1. Mix all the ingredients except cucumber together.
2. Add cucumber, toss to cover, and chill in fridge.
3. Eat (cold) in an hour, or tomorrow.

Leftover Cucumber
Leftover Cucumber
Marinade Mix
Marinade Mix

 

 
Hmmm, apparently I forgot all about the website’s recommendation to eat it with sesame seeds. I’ll have to try that too.

Cucumber Salad (Sunomono)!
Cucumber Salad (Sunomono)!

 

This week’s trial recipe ratings:

Novelty:  0, I’ve done this before.
Likelihood of repeat: 100%, since 2007.

This recipe has proven itself a tasty snack, side, and picnic item. It keeps pretty well if you need something that’s made in advance, and doesn’t need to be warmed up to taste good.