Browsing Category: Vegetarian

Empanada-rama at Stephanie’s: I wish I could take a picture of this smell!

 

Empanada:

The name comes from the verb empanar, meaning to wrap or coat in bread … Empanadas have their origins in Galicia (Spain) and Portugal. They first appeared in Medieval Iberia during the time of the Moorish invasions. A cookbook published in Catalan in 1520 mentions empanadas filled with seafood among its recipes of Catalan, Italian, French, and Arabian food. It is believed that empanadas and the very similar calzones are both derived from the Arabic meat-filled pies, samosas. The dish was carried to Latin America and the Philippines by Spanish colonists, where they remain very popular to this day.

Majura Primary School in Watson, Australia +portions confirmed in NY Times article +The Spruce.com*

A dish truly borne of our collective human heritage!

Proxy guest post, because my friend Stephanie says she doesn’t like writing about herself. As one who loves all dough-wrapped dishes, she hosted the empanada-rama.

This recipe for dough won out:
Thanks, Laylita! How to Make Empanada Dough for Baking Continue Reading

What is that?! How to try a new vegetable

Novelty is the spice of life. Oh wait, that’s variety. Well, I like novelty..

Step 1: Walk inside a grocery store, bodega or your favorite market.

Step 2: Spot a piece of produce that makes your brain itch with curiosity. In this case: this delightfully geometric vegetable next to the cauliflower.

Face-off: cauliflower vs romanesco. Winter is here (in other words, these are in season).
Magic sauce: also known as butter and some other stuff.

Continue Reading

Pro-Tip Tuesday: Free Scallion Starts!

Do you wish you didn’t have to go to the store every time you needed green onions (a.k.a. scallions)?

Next time you chop a bunch of ’em to cook, save the bottom bits -the part with the roots- and plop them in a jar with a little bit of water in the bottom. Change the water every day or so and watch them grow! I’ve gradually moved mine into the planter boxes on my patio over time (especially in the summer months), but I hear you can also just leave them in a glass with water. Voila, now you have green onions in the future, and didn’t even need to buy any seeds. Advice: don’t leave the same water in there too long or it can start to rot.

Day 3 of scallions in a glass: look! They’re reaching for the water!

I felt inspired to share this after my friend Michelle expressed surprise at seeing me with this trick. Apparently, the internet’s covered it. However, I offer links to bonus content for other allium-related info for your entertainment. Continue Reading

Pro-Tip Tuesday: Free Seeds for Gardening, Summer Dreams Included!

upoAre you stuck inside, dreaming of next year’s garden? Are the kids (or your inner child) driving you nuts as you scrape the bottom of the bucket on distracting -er- enriching indoor activities to keep them busy learning?

Maybe your New Year’s resolution was to save money to put them toward some personal goals.

Did you know, you can get free seeds for gardening? Continue Reading

Chef Kyle Wisner’s Lunch Break Demo @the Book Larder

One overcast Monday morning, I ventured over to the Book Larder, a community cookbook store on Fremont Ave of Seattle. I’ve ridden past there many a time by bike and by bus, and always meant to go. Finally, I found time and managed to sign up for classes a few days ahead.

Note: if you are scrambling for last minute gifts for people who love to eat, cooking classes may be a good option that ships instantaneously! Be mindful to check if it’s a demo, or hands-on, as that may matter depending on how much your loved one likes to cook (i.e. more hands-on for those who are into working with their hands, more demo for those who are more into eating the final product). Go ahead, click away from this post, I won’t mind.. 🙂

Chef Kyle Wisner did a delicious demo for the group on some straightforward recipes for swift home cooking, perfect for a hectic holiday season. Below are some recipes he shared, editorial commentary is my own.

Pork Roast

Ingredients:

Center-cut pork roast
Enough za’atar spices to cover surface of the roast
kosher salt to preference

Tools: oven, , baking dish, meat thermometer

Steps:

  1. Salt the roast “aggressively”, like any steak or other big cut of meat, rest the roast out to room temperature before roasting. Preheat oven to 400 (or 425F if your oven is weak sauce).
  2. Cover surface in za’atar spice.
  3. Bake roast in oven until it reaches an internal temp of 120F, approximately 18-30 minutes. It will likely still be a little pink in the middle, but the juices will disperse back and finish as you let the roast rest a while before serving.
  4. Optional: bonus points for drawing a depiction of “aggressively salting.”

Continue Reading

Pro-Tip Tuesday: Buy the Oranges, and Make Macaroons too!

Pro-Tip of the Day:
Have you been buying those boxes and bags of oranges on sale at the store?

Next time pick up a bag of coconut flakes and sliced almonds, and you can make this quick, yummy (gluten-free) byproduct treat from in-season fruit!

Just remember to take 30 seconds to grate the rind off before you eat the orange, and you’ll have enough for this recipe. Note: try not to take too much of the white parts (the pith), that’s bitter. Continue Reading

Pro-Tip Tuesday: Splitting Squash

This post is dedicated to my friend Abby, who inspired me to share this tip on how to cut into a stubborn winter squash when she told me she had a butternut waiting at her new apartment.

Happy Thanksgiving week to those in the U.S. (and happy Autumn harvest to the rest)! Got a squash on the menu to make? Here’s a tip for splitting squash. Why muscle through it, when you can use tools. Continue Reading

Tieton Cider Works at City Fruit

Another week, another article for City Fruit’s 6th Annual Cider Taste (on November 10, 2016), written by Yours Truly. Tieton Cider Works at City Fruit’S 2016 Cider Tasting
Check it out!

All event proceeds will benefit the 2016 harvest, which brings fresh, local fruit to over 50 meal programs and food banks across the city.

Pro-Tip Tuesday: Pouring without Spilling

Are you a klutz like me, always spilling liquids when you pour them from one container to another?

Try this trick I learned from my father, the chemist!
I like to imagine him pouring oodles of liquids from beaker to beaker in his multiple decades of work.

Hint: having a utensil helps.

In summary, if you have an unreliable container you know will spill, knowing this trick can really help. I favor a chopstick for best results, and most recently found this useful when pouring home made chicken stock into ice cube trays to save for later. Revision: since doing this, I now favor a spoon, it guide the liquid to spread a bit better at the bottom.

P.S. Thanks to K_____ for the spontaneous cinematography.

Snowdrift Cider at City Fruit’s Annual Cider Tasting

Hey folks, you may recall an earlier springtime post on a Fruit Cycle tour, it was arranged by City Fruit, a nonprofit in Seattle which works to promote and protect urban fruit trees, and share the extra fruit with those in need.
City Fruit’s 6th Annual Cider Taste is on November 10, 2016. In the ramp-up to that, I wrote up a little ditty on Snowdrift Cider Co. for them. Read all about it, and get tickets to the tasting on the City Fruit Blog.
Check it out!

All event proceeds will benefit the 2016 harvest, which brings fresh, local fruit to over 50 meal programs and food banks across the city.