Tag Archives: cycling

Friday is Bike Everywhere Day!
Plan your commute accordingly, Friends.

2013 Bike to Work Day celebration in Ballard, Seattle

Felt compelled to do this PSA:

Friday May 18th is Bike Everywhere Day!

I’m just going to leave this link for Bike Everywhere Month here …

Check it out for a map of the fun bike stations that will pop up around town on Friday. It’s a fun party atmosphere (er, starting at 6AM), and I’m hoping this year will be even more festive thanks to all those dockless bikes available for riding. By “fun” I mean free stuff like bike lights, chocolate samples (see: Fremont Bridge stop), music and free food. Check it out, Peddler’s Brewing is having a party 4-8 that day! The feature photo for this quick post is from a previous year’s bike celebration in Ballard.

How do YOU plan your commute?

Further Reading:

Shoutout to Tricia who, after a couple years’ convincing, finally talked me into bike commuting back in 2013, and the whole Bike to Work Team buddies I had downtown.* Miss you guys even more than that waffle breakfast we did, sniffle…

 

*Also: Shelley and Tricia who both biked with me on my first couple rides, and Tesia who helped calculate my [low] odds of accident per trip to allay my risk averse brain.

Pro-Tip Tuesday:
How to Fit More Gym Clothes in Your Bag

Did you make a resolution to get active and work out more this month?

 

Are you feeling frazzled trying to stuff all your exercise clothes in a gym bag so you can work out before your commute home, but kind of favoring that “Old Bag Lady” (or Old Bag Gentleman) look in the process, juggling large. lumpy sacs of clothes and food and work tools on the way out the door?

 

Here’s a travel tip that I found works well for workout commuting as well: Continue Reading

Tricking Yourself into Exercise:
Recipe for an Active Day on Two Wheels with City Fruit

Apple trees in Meridian Park, approximately 100 years old. Netted by City Fruit to protect fruit from pests.

I really wanted you to know this:

Apples most likely originated in Kazakhstan from the Malus sieversii and brought over to America with European colonists then became a part of American culture with a little help from Mr. Appleseed himself, John Chapman. Around the turn of the 19th century, Johnny Appleseed bought some apple seeds from a Pennsylvania cider mill and headed to the Midwest to develop his orchards. At the time, the Homestead Act required settlers to plant 50 apple trees within the first year of holding their land and soon the apples, along with the settlers, began to establish their roots in America.
Layla Eplett, Scientific American: Food Matters

Continue Reading