Tag Archives: egg

Leftovers Congee with Faux Fish Katsu and Crispy Garlic

Dear Readers -all five of you’s (besides the spammers),
Besides being busy with real life, I’ve had a few dud recipes I am still tinkering with before I admit to having tried them at all. I have more busy life adventures coming up too, so this blog may continue to fall off…
When I’m 80 and looking back (hopefully I’ll be so lucky), I’m pretty sure I won’t say, “aw man, I wish that instead of spending time with people in person I had updated my food blog more!” Plus, I’m pretty sure when you’re 80 and looking back (I wish you the same luck), no one in the history of the world ever said, “aw man! I wish I’d had more blog entries to read about food!”

Random Sunday brunch trial time! ..based in leftover rice from restaurant Revel‘s rice bowl dish with short rib, sambal daikon, and mustard green, plus inspirations from my “roommate”‘s meal selections on trips to Tokyo, and another friend’s rendition of Chicken Arroz Caldo (click here for a random example recipe). My mother would make me really bland congee as a kid when I was sick (or perfectly healthy). Along with fried rice, rice porridge can be a great dish to stretch the rice you have. I took a verbal test in Chinese language once involving a hypothetical dialogue at a fancy hotel, and I still remember my professor being surprised I ordered congee. That was when I learned it’s considered poor folk’s food. Little did he know, they still serve congee at the fancy breakfast buffets in high-end hotels in Asia, because people still like it there too. I seen it with me own eyes.

Leftovers congee with faux fish sticks and crispy garlic, ..and a fried egg, and chives, and corn hiding underneath..
Leftovers congee with faux fish sticks and crispy garlic, and a fried egg, and chives, and corn hiding underneath..

Leftovers Congee* with Faux Fish Katsu and Crispy Garlic

Ingredients:
About 1 cup leftover restaurant rice (the more random delicious flavors in it from, say, short ribs, the better)
~2 cups chicken broth**
~2 cups boiling water**

Optional Toppings:
3 frozen fish sticks
1 tsp chives, minced (could also do scallions)
1 raw egg
1/4 tsp shredded ginger (not included this time, but only because I’m pretty sure there was already ginger in the rice)
4 cloves garlic, sliced thin
1 Tbs olive oil
1/4 cup frozen sweet corn
optional but recommended if you make the garlic: breath mints

*Note: this recipe is titled congee, but there are near-infinite variations on this dish across Asia, and even in Portugal (see wikipedia article).
**Liquid amounts are approximate, usually a 1:4 ratio is good for porridge, but it depends on how you like it. Various areas and individual people prefer from runny porridge, to really thick porridge. If you find it is too thick you can always add more water or broth.

Directions:
1. Boil rice in broth and water until it reaches your desired consistency, 45-1.5 hrs. This can be done via a rice cooker, or in a more watchable format on stovetop. I actually started mine in my high-tech rice cooker so I wouldn’t have to tend it, then found it was too runny for my taste and boiled it on the stovetop another 10 minutes to thicken.
2. Meanwhile, prepare fish sticks per packaging. Toast for a few minutes at the end for extra crunchiness.
3. Set a frying pan with the olive oil to medium heat, once pan is hot, add garlic slices, flipping a few times and frying for just a few minutes until golden brown on both sides. Be careful to take garlic off the pan before it gets to burning.
4. Use the residual oil in the pan to fry an egg over easy on the pan.
5. Assemble toppings on rice (put the sweet corn on the bottom of your bowl before you load in the soup) and enjoy!

This Week’s Trial Recipe Rating:
Novelty Rating:
3 of 5 stars
I usually have rice porridge with dried pork sung, but was abysmally low on it in the pantry (since I no longer will just eat it straight out of the package like I did when I was a kid, so supply habits are low), but was on a fish stick kick from yesterday, it was okay but I generally feel a little bad about eating such a processed food. The crispy garlic was quite novel and delicious, though. I may make that again next time i feel like making congee.
Likelihood of Repeat: 65%
Unlikely to deign to make frozen fish sticks with this again, but it was worth the shot. I think next time it may be worth trying to boil it with all broth and not water.
Lesson Learned: The egg did not need to be completely done to the level desired for eating, since it continues to cook once placed atop the rice porridge, some pickled vegetables might have been nice to try too. I think I would rather have done scallions than chives..
Post-script: I had dragon garlic breath the rest of the day, so it may be good to have some breath mints or a toothbrush and toothpaste on hand.

Reader Input:
Do you make a ridge porridge? What variations do you like to do, and what are your favorite things to top it with?

Sunday Recipe: Chicken Pot Pie

As a child growing up in the Midwest with home-cooked Chinese food for dinner, microwave dinners were some kind of marvelous space food I’d get to eat on special occasions (see: babysitter). Among those dinners, the best option often seemed to be the chicken pot pie, which could be easily popped in the toaster oven for a satisfying belly-sticking meal in a tin pan. Years later I picked up a recipe magazine based purely on the delectable-looking chicken pot pie on the front. I think it was a Reader’s Digest. Anyway, it seemed like such a novel and miraculous opportunity to learn to make pot pie, it has found an honored place in my recipe Dropbox files, usually only brought out to make something even better out of Thanksgiving turkey leftovers.

Fast forward to Labor Day weekend, and some old friends are in town and have made a special request for chicken pot pie. When good friends you haven’t seen in a years ask for pot pie, then you make pot pie.
Good thing I ended up with three great sous chefs to keep things rolling that Sunday..

Chicken Pot Pie
Based originally on ..a Reader’s Digest recipe
Serves 4
Prep time: 50 min
Total time: ~.5 hrs prep + 1.5 hr + chilling (approx. 35 min chilling 2x)

Ingredients:
4 Tbs unsalted butter
1 medium onion, cut into medium dice
2-3 large carrots, cut into medium dice
1/2 c all-purpose flour, plus more for work surface (whole wheat flour works fine too)
coarse salt & pepper
4 c low-sodium chicken broth (or veggie stock)
3 c cooked chicken, cut into 1-inch pieces (1 lb total)
1 c frozen peas
1.5 tsp chopped fresh thyme leaves (or .75 tsp dried thyme)
1 sheet frozen puff pastry, thawed
1 large egg yolk
Optional: garlic powder, random italian seasonings

Steps:
1. In a medium saucepan, melt butter over medium. Add onion and carrot and cook until onion softens, about 6 minutes. Add flour and 1/2 tsp salt; cook, stirring frequently, until mixture is pale golden, has a slightly nutty aroma, and is the texture of cooked oatmeal, about 5 minutes.
2. Whisking constantly, add broth. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently, until mixture thickens, about 8 minutes. Reduce to a simmer and cook 10 minutes. Stir in chicken, peas and thyme; season with salt and pepper (optional: garlic powder and italian seasoning). Divide mixture among four 12-ounce baking dishes; refrigerate until room temperature, about 20 minutes. Try to fill the dishes as full as possible to help support the dough on time so it gets a chance to rise. In the case of this last time I made pot pie, the baking dishes with filling were put in a cooler with ice and transported for the ~30 minutes to a friend’s house before continuing to the next step.

Thanks to sous chef K for speedy packing of baking dishes in a cooler to get on the road, and sous chefs A and J for all the chopping.
Saute, saute, stir, stir, chill. Thanks to sous chef K for speedy packing of baking dishes in a cooler to get on the road, and sous chefs A and J for all the chopping.

2.5 Optional step: get to your friend’s house and realize you forgot the puff pastry, half the group heads to the store to buy some more. :p
3. Preheat oven to 375 F. On a lightly floured work surface, roll pastry to an 1/8 inch thickness. Cut into 4 equal squares, 1 inch larger than dishes; with the tip of a sharp knife, cut vents into pastry. In a small bowl, lightly beat egg yolk with 1 tsp water; top potpies with pastry and brush with egg wash.
4. Refrigerate 15 minutes.
Chill, top with dough and egg wash, chill more, and bake. Also shown: random ingredients in leftover puff pastry by sous chefs.
Chill, top with dough and egg wash, chill more, and bake. Also shown: random ingredients in leftover puff pastry by sous chefs.

5. Bake until pastry is deep golden and juices are bubbling, about 35-45 minutes. It can be useful to put a wide dish underneath to catch any accidental overflow.
6. When serving, be sure to warn people the pot pie is very hot.

Careful, it's piping hot to the tongue!
Careful, it’s piping hot to the tongue!

7. Take a food coma nap.

Top: all done! This pie was split between two people and still plenty filling. Bottom: sous chef  posing with post-dinner asleep chef. Zzzz.
Top: all done! This pie was split between two people and still plenty filling. Bottom: sous chef posing with post-dinner asleep chef. Zzzz. I found this photo on my phone later after I woke up.

Today’s Trial Recipe Rating:
Novelty Rating: 1.5 of 5 stars.
As mentioned, I usually only make this about once a year after Thanksgiving, so on that note, it’s a bit novel.
Likelihood of Repeat: 100%
It’s quite a bit of work, which is partly why I use pre-made puff pastry instead of dough from scratch. However, all that care and attention only makes it more worth eating.

Lesson Learned: You will never have leftovers from this, unless you keep the filling separate from the dough and don’t bake it. Also, you can make whatever design you want when cutting slits in the top of the dough. Exercising the patience for full refrigeration time is pretty key to making sure the crust doesn’t get soggy and collapse, and having moderately shallow baking dishes gives you a good crust-to-filling ratio. Don’t be afraid to use more vegetables.
A variant to try later: putting crust underneath the filling too, per my friend S____________’s requests. Comment here if you’ve done this!

Paleo Meatballs

On request of my ‘roommate,’ I tried this recipe from Easy Peasy, for paleo meatballs. It’s almost identical to the ones I usually make (which, by the way, get rave reviews by same roommate -beef, not turkey per the URL), except without breadcrumbs, a few more spices (oregano, basil), and added spinach. Never parsley. Boo parsley. It is only better than cilantro, which is the worst. Funny that anyone needs a paleo version of meatballs.. I followed the second option for directions that Angela mentioned: fry, then bake.

mince, mix, meld into balls, mmmmheat, and mmserve!
mince, mix, meld into balls, mmmmheat, and mmserve!

Paleo Meatballs

Ingredients:
1lb. grass fed ground beef
1 egg
1tsp garlic powder
1tsp paprika
salt and pepper to taste (about 1/2tsp salt and 1/4tsp pepper)
1/2 small onion, minced (I used minced red onion here)
1Tbsp spinach (optional)
1Tbsp fresh parsley (optional)

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
2. In a large bowl, scramble egg and combine remaining ingredients, mix.
3. Using a spoon, shape into meatballs. I tried for small ones, a little bigger than the diameter of a quarter. That’s the way I like my food portioned –meatballs, or cookies, or whatever.
4. The original recipe said that for a little crunch if you’re up for an extra step, heat a pan with about 1 Tbsp olive oil and brown on both sides, then bake 10-15 minutes until thoroughly cooked. This pan fry step made the house smell really tasty, plus, it led to..
5. Extra credit: sauté/ wilt some fresh vegetables in the remaining meaty-oil mix on the pan. I did this with spinach and a little minced garlic.

I served this with a side of barbecue sauce, a spring mix salad, garlic sautéed spinach, atop some leftover garlickified quinoa (see: fry up lots of minced garlic, add leftover cooked quinoa until warm), and atop some red rice I found in the back of the pantry. Of course, you could also eat it with pasta, or zucchini pasta, or just baked in barbecue sauce..

meatballs: not vegetarian.
meatballs: not vegetarian.

Today’s Trial Recipe Rating:
Novelty Rating: 2 of 5 stars
I may have never tried this exact rendition, but it sure did feel familiar.
Likelihood of Repeat: 40%
The other eater seemed to like them. It seems in the past that any time I make meatballs, no matter how much I tried to make extra, we didn’t end up with much left, so that’s a good sign. However, I still believe that the ones with breadcrumbs taste better, so I’ll probably only make these ones on specific request, or for my gluten-liberated friends. It might be worth trying without the spinach next time.

New standard review note!
Lesson Learned: Shaping meatballs always takes a little more time than you imagine, and don’t plan for leftovers.

Half-way Homemade Mini Quiches

MiniQuichesCollage
Defrost dough, mix egg, pour, bake, enjoy.

Picked up another recipe from A Beautiful Mess for mini quiches (original recipe is here, I added a couple things). Tried it yesterday during the Seahawks v. Saints game.

puff pastry (I took out a piece and set it in the fridge in saran wrap to defrost overnight instead of having to add 30-40 minutes’ lead time from the freezer)
3 eggs
2 Tbs half and half
salt + pepper
1/4 cup shredded parmesan
1/8 cup chopped ham
1 Tbs chopped scallions
1 tsp dried thyme
Butter

Preheat the oven to 350°F. In a bowl whisk together the eggs, cream, ham, scallions, thyme, salt and pepper. Buttered 2 large ramekins (4.5″ diameter). Cut puff pastry into large squares that will slightly hang over once placed in the baking dishes. Fill 2/3 full with the egg batter. Fold the edges in toward the center. Sprinkle on the cheese and bake for 35-40 minutes, until the egg looks set.

MiniQuicheComplete
The final product.

Today’s Trial Recipe Rating:
Novelty Rating: 3 of 5 stars
This was a brand new combo to try, and the ease of using defrosted puff pastry really appealed to me. However, as I made it, it reminded me more and more of the baked eggs I’ve been baking the last few months, which involves very similar ingredients, minus the pastry and scrambling and whip up faster. The novelty also wore off quickly as I ended up timing it for a post-lunch snack, but me and my partner were still full from a delicious late lunch.
Likelihood of Repeat: 20%
I had to wait a day and reheat before I could finish a whole ramekin, and the whole thing really turned out to be very heavy on the pastry side, and it felt like most of the egg mixture disappeared. Adding some fresh tomato and basil made it feel renewed a little, but I will be looking for other methods to finish the leftover puff pastry in the freezer, probably something involving jam..
If I did try it again, I’d up the egg ratio, add tomatoes, and maybe roll out the pastry more so there’s less of it to balloon up and take over. This is definitely a carb-rich recipe.

Do you have other favorite combos for puff pastry? Let me know.

MiniQuicheCompetingSteakFrites
the competition in my stomach that made it there before the quiche: steak-frite lunch on spring mix salad.

Method Break: Poached Egg by Microwave

In case you’ve not heard, you can poach an egg in the microwave! It took me a few tries but I finally got it about right for my particular microwave.

In vintage (a.k.a. janky) microwave:
1. Add 1/2 c water to a small bowl, carefully crack egg in, cover loosely.
2. Heat 50 seconds at power level 8.
Voila!

You may need to fiddle a few different ways to figure out the right amount of time and power for your microwave, and it’s not exactly the same as an over easy fried egg fresh from the pan since it cooks more evenly, but I found it quite satisfying to be able to have a soft, yolky egg to top whatever leftovers I had, be it rice, squash, ramen, or even salad.

20131205-131831.jpg

Spanish Bread & Garlic Soup

(October Week 5 Trial)
I banked this Spanish Bread & Garlic Soup recipe in my Evernote recipe folder last April waiting for the right day, which apparently meant in the Fall, when I’m in the mood for soup. Having to watch the video for the actual instructions behind ingredients -including turning the heat up and down a bunch- may have had something to do with it.

I started with the prescribed ingredients, including some home made chicken stock from a Sunday a few weeks ago:

Ze Ingredientz
Ze Ingredientz

Baked the bread at 350 for 15 minutes and forgot to include olive oil, sliced tons of garlic thin by hand (my amateur area of expertise!), sauteed it, then sauteed the ham..

bread, garlic, garlic, garlic, ham, olive oil
bread, garlic, garlic, garlic, ham, olive oil

Added the bread to the mix, and paprika..

emphasis on the BREAD and garlic soup

Brought it to a boil, salted, peppered and cayenned it to taste, and popped in a couple eggs* in to poach on low covered,

ooh, steamy
ooh, steamy

Voila! Bread and garlic soup!

Spanish bread & garlic soup
Spanish bread & garlic soup

This week’s trial recipe ratings:
novelty: 4 of 5 stars
likelihood of repeat: 75%
My test audience of one mentioned it was a little carby, and I have to agree. I was not expecting quite so much bread-to-garlic substance ratio. I think I’ll probably make this on a lazy weekend for half the portion size, and possibly when I’m the only one home. It’s definitely a good recipe for a low budget if you have some stale bread lying around, paprika, broth and garlic.

*Let’s just pretend the first egg was not lost to the bready, soupy abyss and got overcooked, and that this perfect, just-runny egg in the picture was the only final product.

Addendum: Four days later and I finally finished the leftovers, what was I thinking on those giant portions! A tasty poached egg with a just-runny yolk definitely makes the flavor right in this soup, which I found hard to replicate via microwave egg poaching at work (yolk gets cooked too fast too evenly). I may try this poached egg addition to some other soups too.