Tag Archives: history

MOHAI’s Edible City Exhibit – An Inclusive Exploration of Seattle’s Food Landscape

One overcast Friday, I ventured to the Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) to check out their Edible City exhibit with my friend Sarah and her two kiddos. We wandered in from the parking lot feeling lucky to have found a spot (not free, max 4 hrs) to park and paid the $20 per adult. The kiddos got in free since they were under 14 years old.

Four visitors to the MOHAI, ranging from ages 2 to 34.

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Food-Related Podcasts Worth A Listen

Happy New Year!

If, like me, you have been cocooning for the winter and don’t feel like leaving the house,* here are some of my favorite food podcasts. The overall theme appears to be stories on food and its origins, and how it connects us.

Gravy: the Southern Foodways Alliance has been putting out some really exciting stories over there, exploring stories and histories of food from different cultures living in the United States that traditionally haven’t had a loud voice in the mainstream.

The Sporkful: funny, down to earth. “The Sporkful isn’t for foodies, it’s for eaters.”

Gastropod: food with a side of science. Heard their oyster episode just as I was putting finishing touches on my post about going to Taylor Shellfish on a road trip. I’ve really enjoyed their stuff.

Racist Sandwich: lives in the intersection between food, race, gender and class, and shares some very frank perspectives.

On the Radar:

Food Without Borders: Food writer Sari Kamin speaks with guests on how food helps connect them to their past, ease potential conflict across cultures and strengthen the future. She also explores the immigrant experience in the U.S. today.
Food is the New Rock: every week Zach Brooks talks music with a chef, or food with a musician.
Food for Thought: stories related to food in Seattle, under the NPR umbrella.

Heritage Radio Network: the only online food station.

Honorable Mention:
The Splendid Table: American Public Media’s classic show on food.
Taste of the Past: with all the time spent listening to the ones above, this one doesn’t get my ears as much, but still makes it on the list.


Do you have a favorite food-related podcast that’s not listed here?

Please post in the comments and share, or tweet me @FoodtheWongWay.

Photo by Patrick Breitenbach.

*Exceptions: snowscapades, and holiday travel.

Tricking Yourself into Exercise:
Recipe for an Active Day on Two Wheels with City Fruit

Apple trees in Meridian Park, approximately 100 years old. Netted by City Fruit to protect fruit from pests.

I really wanted you to know this:

Apples most likely originated in Kazakhstan from the Malus sieversii and brought over to America with European colonists then became a part of American culture with a little help from Mr. Appleseed himself, John Chapman. Around the turn of the 19th century, Johnny Appleseed bought some apple seeds from a Pennsylvania cider mill and headed to the Midwest to develop his orchards. At the time, the Homestead Act required settlers to plant 50 apple trees within the first year of holding their land and soon the apples, along with the settlers, began to establish their roots in America.
Layla Eplett, Scientific American: Food Matters

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