Tag Archives: history

Podcasts Worth A Listen

I’ve been listening to podcasts since around 2001, when I’d board a shuttle on my college commute, threading my iPod earphones under a down jacket so the wire wouldn’t freeze in the Minnesota winter and crackle the sound. Here’s my latest list of regulars on my Stitcher app.

food-related . curious about the world . storytelling & creativity . news

Food-Related Podcasts

Stories on food and its origins and how it connects us, plus a strong thread of hearing the less-told stories of how minority groups or unexpected narratives contributed to mainstream food culture.

Food Without Borders: Food writer Sari Kamin speaks with guests on how food helps connect them to their past, ease potential conflict across cultures and strengthen the future. She also explores the immigrant experience in the U.S. today.

Gastropod: food with a side of science. Heard their oyster episode just as I was putting finishing touches on my post about going to Taylor Shellfish on a road trip. This is current go-to podcast each week, as of Spring 2018.

Gravy: the Southern Foodways Alliance has been putting out some really exciting stories over there, exploring stories and histories of food from different cultures living in the United States that traditionally haven’t had a loud voice in the mainstream.

Heritage Radio Network: the only online food station, and a powerhouse of food-related segments.

Racist Sandwich: lives in the intersection between food, race, gender and class, and shares some very frank perspectives.

The Sporkful: funny, down to earth. “The Sporkful isn’t for foodies, it’s for eaters.”

On the Radar

Podcasts not always in my regular rotation but worth considering.

The Dave Chang Show: multimedia mogul, foodways vanguard, and student of life David Chang hosts a series of guests to talk about their inspirations, failures, successes, fame, and identities. Between watching Ugly Delicious and restaurant news, a person only has so many hours in a day to spend hearing about all the great things caused by David Chang, which is the only reason this doesn’t always make my regular rotation in 2018. Bonus points: this show is part of The Ringer family from my favorite voice in the sports-related podcast realm. Full disclosure: K calls Dave Chang my cultural appropriation outrage soul mate, ha.

Food for Thought: stories related to food in Seattle, under the NPR umbrella.

Special Sauce: comes from the Serious Eats professionals, hosted by Ed Levine.

Do you have a favorite food-related podcast that’s not listed here?

Post in the comments and share, or tweet me @FoodtheWongWay.

Other Podcasts in Rotation

Curious about the world, looking for kindness, good stories, PNW news and inspiring life paths.

Curious About the World

99% Invisible: stories for those curious about the world!

Awesome Etiquette Podcast: I am a long-time fan of Lizzie Post and Dan Post Senning’s etiquette podcast, which offers thoughtful, friendly advice on how to be kinder to people. Yep, they are descendants of the etiquette authority, Emily Post. I heartily agree with the sentiments on the Emily Post Institute, “being considerate, respectful, and honest is more important than knowing which fork to use. Whether it’s a handshake or a fist bump, it’s the underlying sincerity and good intentions of the action that matter most.”

Freakonomics: Steve Levitt and Stephen Dubner, co-authors of the book of same name, “explore the riddles of everyday life and the weird wrinkles of human nature”. This podcast regularly scratches my curious behavioral economics itch in life.

Hidden Brain: a conversation about life’s unseen patterns.

Lexicon Valley (Slate): John McWhorter explores the history and roots of different language questions.

Planet Money: like the title of this blog, the name of this podcast may seem misleadingly narrow, it touches on so many more aspects of our lives, and features great in-depth stories.

Storytelling & Creativity

Binge Mode (from The Ringer): I actually don’t have this on my Stitcher list, but Mallory Rubin and Jason Concepcion’s voices make it into my daily life via my partner’s podcast list through their dialogue based on binge watching various TV show series of the day. Other stories from The Ringer that I would otherwise not expect to care about seem to have one extra level of quality and compelling storytelling when Bill Simmons is involved..

Levar Burton Reads: Levar Burton reads to us! OMG, Reading Rainbow Nostalgia meets Star Trek #NextGeneration fandom meets new re-introductions to fiction from a fellow sci-fi fan. A recent read offered up an amazing listen of a short story by Octavia Butler, an amazingly insightful author (and one of the few racial minorities widely published in the mainstream sci fi genre a few decades ago). We should count ourselves lucky Mr. Burton is gracing us with his continued voice in the pool of narrative storytelling in this day and age.

The Moth Radio Hour: personal storytelling told from Moth events around the world that pulls at your heartstrings. I have actually been a paying donor of this podcast when it fit in my budget.

The Unmistakeable Creative: interviews with entrepreneurial people sharing their successes, failures, and inspiring stories.

News

Marketplace Morning Report: this is my perfunctory morning commute listen.

The Record (KUOW): local conversations from Puget Sound stories (KUOW is also 94.9 FM).

Seattleland: an excellent podcast out in 2018 of local PNW stories, backed by Seattle Weekly. I love how this format allows you to spend a little more time and care for the people at the center of the stories, even while they touch on very current concerns of the day.

MOHAI’s Edible City Exhibit – An Inclusive Exploration of Seattle’s Food Landscape

One overcast Friday, I ventured to the Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) to check out their Edible City exhibit with my friend Sarah and her two kiddos. We wandered in from the parking lot feeling lucky to have found a spot (not free, max 4 hrs) to park and paid the $20 per adult. The kiddos got in free since they were under 14 years old.

Four visitors to the MOHAI, ranging from ages 2 to 34.

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Tricking Yourself into Exercise:
Recipe for an Active Day on Two Wheels with City Fruit

Apple trees in Meridian Park, approximately 100 years old. Netted by City Fruit to protect fruit from pests.

I really wanted you to know this:

Apples most likely originated in Kazakhstan from the Malus sieversii and brought over to America with European colonists then became a part of American culture with a little help from Mr. Appleseed himself, John Chapman. Around the turn of the 19th century, Johnny Appleseed bought some apple seeds from a Pennsylvania cider mill and headed to the Midwest to develop his orchards. At the time, the Homestead Act required settlers to plant 50 apple trees within the first year of holding their land and soon the apples, along with the settlers, began to establish their roots in America.
Layla Eplett, Scientific American: Food Matters

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