Tag Archives: lemon

Braised Chickpea Chard Coconut Meal
Translated for Backpacking!

Components:
1 c dehydrated braised chickpea chard coconut & couscous
1.5 c hot boiled water
About 35 minutes sit time, stir after 20*

Bored with your dehydrated backpacking meal rotation?
This just in: braised coconut chickpea & spinach recipe from The Kitchn works out as a dehydrated camp meal! Completed my trial of it yesterday with a taste test with some old friends.** Clockwise from top left: in my friend Alessandra‘s dehydrator, vacuum sealed +couscous (stored in freezer for optimum dryness while I was out galavanting), mid-hydration, ready to eat! Special thanks to Alessandra for loaning the dehydrator, and Torey for pointing me to the original recipe years ago while we were waiting for our S.O.s to finish the Vermont Beast.

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What is that?! How to try a new vegetable

Novelty is the spice of life. Oh wait, that’s variety. Well, I like novelty..

Step 1: Walk inside a grocery store, bodega or your favorite market.

Step 2: Spot a piece of produce that makes your brain itch with curiosity. In this case: this delightfully geometric vegetable next to the cauliflower.

Face-off: cauliflower vs romanesco. Winter is here (in other words, these are in season).
Magic sauce: also known as butter and some other stuff.

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Video Post: the World is Your Oyster!
Just Try One…

My friend T.J. will hopefully get a kick out of this post. He’s a big fan of oysters. Everybody say, “Hi T.J.!”

Earlier this Fall, K____ and I went on a short road trip up Chuckanut Drive just north of Seattle to celebrate our anniversary. After an acutely alarming night in Burlington spent in the hotel across from an active shooter incident happening live, we were really feeling the gratitude for being alive, and  savoring the world at hand. On top of that, I was also feeling reflective given that it was our anniversary, observed.

I even ate a burger with the pickle intact. This, from some one who used to avoid them at all costs. I thank Korean banchan (side dishes which tend to have pickled vegetables) for that shift. A great day for observing my “try eating things you didn’t like about every 10 years,” guideline.

The last stop coming back south from Bellingham was at Taylor Shellfish Farm. I was not fond of seafood as a kid, and growing up in the Land of 10,000 Lakes and no saltwater, who could blame me for only eating the fresh sunnies and walleye my parents would catch on a day off?* Given my crustacean allergy, the bivalves have gotten a free pass lately with me, with the exception of seared scallops. Them bivalves just didn’t hold very much appeal for me.

So, at the Farm, we drank in the beautiful view of the Puget Sound, and were about to get back in the car for the long drive home,

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The Lemon Concoction You Want to Try Next Time Your Throat Hurts

Finally over it, but I caught a cough a few weeks ago and fought with it for almost two weeks. Started a new job, so it didn’t seem like I could really just call in sick my first day. It was downhill from there. My friend Yvonne recommended making this tasty concoction to mix in with hot water and drink. After a week or so of drinking luo han kuo (a.k.a. monkfruit) beverage* and so much pho I felt pho’d out, it was nice to try something different. It was really nice on the throat, and I just wish I’d managed to get up the gumption to start making it sooner so my sore throat could enjoy it for longer.

Lemon, Honey, and Ginger Soother for Colds and Sore Throats
Originally from Lana Stuart’s blog.

Prep time: 5 mins
Total time: 24 hours

Ingredients
2-3 lemons
1″ piece fresh ginger root**
1/2 to 1 cup honey
I pretty much winged it on the portions here to taste. Continue Reading

Beat the Heat: Part Zillion!
Zucchini Basil Salad

Fresh back from a cross-country road trip through 4 national parks, three rolls of campfire-cooked Pillsbury products, and too many kinds of 80+-degree weather, I give you…

Cold Zucchini Basil Salad
A variation from simply real health I googled after a random Instagram find.

Ingredients:
1 large heirloom tomato, sliced into bite-sized pieces
3-4 zucchini total (prefer a mix of green and yellow summer squash)
1/4 c goat cheese
A handful of basil, rolled and chopped into ribbons
olive oil (the highest quality you have on hand)
Salt & pepper, to taste
1 fresh lemon
1/4 c slivered almonds

Steps:
1. With a vegetable peeler, thinly scrape the zucchini and summer squash into long ribbon slices, tossing the seedy core, or saving it for a Sunday frittata mix.
2. Add the ribbons to a bowl, season with sea salt* and pepper*, basil, drizzle with olive oil* per preference. [*NOTE: if you want salad for later, pack the zucchini separate from the olive oil, salt, pepper and lemon juice to keep the crunch, and combine just before eating]. Toss to mix.

Ribboned zucchini with salt 'n' pepper.
Ribboned zucchini with salt ‘n’ pepper.

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Mustard Lemon Cauliflower

This is a decent weekday recipe, based on the time spent, although you don’t get to just set it in the oven and forget it until it’s done. I cut the original amount of butter with olive oil so you can pretend it’s healthier. The initial recipe is based on one from the November 2006 issue of Bon Appétit available here. You could also just use olive oil, for a lactose-free version. Stay tuned for the next post! I’ve been working on cooking up some interesting posts for y’all.

roasted butter with a little cauliflower, atop quinoa.
roasted butter with a little cauliflower atop quinoa.

Cauliflower with Mustard-Lemon Butter

Ingredients:

  • 1 small head of cauliflower (about 1 3/4 pounds)
  • 1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
  • 1-1.5 tablespoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons whole grain Dijon mustard
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons finely grated lemon peel

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Milan, Italia! Lemon Garlic Pasta & Seared Sea Scallops

That’s right, for the few of you who may have puzzled at the last post, I was in Milan last week a few weeks ago visiting my good friends, J & G. A confluence of events created a last minute opportunity I just couldn’t pass up, despite the usual work pressures. Sleeping in on Monday was all the sweeter for having worked so much extra before.
The last post was of delicious butternut squash risotto, compliments of J & G. There are few things sweeter than the hospitality of friends, in my opinion, and it’s even better when those friends are good cooks, as these two are! They even demonstrated in that last post that it is perfectly possible to cook a good meal with a kitchen the smaller than an American storage unit. Bam.

How did I repay their generous hospitality in sharing a one-bedroom loft apartment with me and my spouse for a week? More, food, of course!

A request for something somewhat light (and fast) was made, so I scaled down the portions of pasta (er, to what was in the pantry), and did one of my favorites -but only if you do it right: seared scallops. G did a great job slapping a salad together to go with, and we hunted up a delicious strawberry tart from pasticceria marchesi, a super old school classic pastry place.

Thanks for the salad, G!
Thanks for the salad, G!

Scallops in Milan

Got the scallops from the local fishmonger, and I was stoked to find they delivered each precious scallop still attached to the shell. I’ve seen it on tv, but never found sea scallops sold this was in the states. They did appear to already have some guttiness removed, though, which was a minor relief.

Pescheria Spadari: yummy seafood source!
Pescheria Spadari: yummy seafood source!

Pasta Timing Notes

First, I prepped the lemon garlic pasta, since if you cook them ‘the right way’ (er, the Wong way), it takes very little time and you want to be paying enough attention to get them off the pan before they are overcooked. This classic in my arsenal has remained largely unchanged since my (other) friend J and I started making it about 15 years ago, from a Byerly’s cookbook, of all things. The main thing different is just a little less oil, and more garlic (always):

Lemon Garlic Pasta

1/2 pound dry angel hair pasta
1/4 cup olive oil (or a smidge less, for a less oily product)
2 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon minced garlic (or TWO teaspons. go wild.)
1 teaspoon grated lemon peel
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon dried marjoram, crushed
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/4 cup chopped parsley

1. cook angel hair pasta according to package directions in boiling water with 1 teaspoon salt; drain.
2. In small saucepan, heat oil and butter, stir in garlic, lemon peel, lemon juice, marjoram, salt and pepper, simmer 2 minutes.
3. transfer pasta to heated serving bowl. toss with oil mixture and parsley. serve immediately.

6 cups.

Similarly, 8+ years ago I decided I only liked sea scallops when they were seared in butter and olive oil, and just barely raw in the middle. I found Alton Brown’s recommendations the most useful: click here for Alton Brown’s Seared Scallops recipe. In this instance, I had one extra (exciting) step, to cut the scallops off the shell, which wasn’t really challenging but still entertainingly novel. My only other advice to myself in my notes on this recipe is just not to get distracted, but resist the urge to move the scallop until just the right time for the 90 second flip, and then removal after the second 90 seconds. Any more time and you’ve overcooked them, any less and you may not get that delicious sweet brown crust.

Voila! Dinner in ~under 30 minutes.

scallops on the half shell!! lemon and pasta ingredients, scallops patted dry and prepped with salt and pepper for the pan, and finally: scallops in the pan full of butter and olive oil.
scallops on the half shell!!
lemon and pasta ingredients, scallops patted dry and prepped with salt and pepper for the pan, and finally: scallops in the pan full of butter and olive oil.
The final product: plated
The final product: plated

Today’s Recipe Rating:
Novelty Rating:
4 of 5 stars.
Very novel to get scallops still in their shells, and even better to serve it to friends living as expats.
Likelihood of Repeat: 90%
Some part of this will be repeated, the lemon garlic pasta has been good for meals for co-workers with new babies and it keeps well enough to serve cold at picnics.
Lesson Learned: Umm…everything is better with friends?

Delicious store-bought follow-up. I will be dreaming of this tart for years. The berries were small but packed with flavor.
Delicious store-bought follow-up. I will be dreaming of this tart for years. The berries were small but packed with flavor.

Renee’s Grandma’s Sugar Cookies (a.k.a. Ardene Hindman’s)

Cookies Part 2 of 4.
Happy Thanksgiving to any fellow American friends out there! Maybe with the long weekend, you’ll want to try a cookie recipe?

sugar cookies: if gluten-free, roll between saran wrap, and add flour for less stickiness.
sugar cookies: if gluten-free, roll between saran wrap, and add flour for less stickiness.

Renee’s Grandma’s Sugar Cookies (a.k.a. Ardene Hindman)
Makes: ummmm, a whole bunch of cookies. I lost count, and I only did a half portion from what’s prescribed below.
Total Time: 60 minutes+, due to cooling time

Ingredients & Directions, per Renee:
“Cream 2 c sugar and 1 c butter.
Add 3 eggs, 1 c sour cream, 1 t salt, 2 t baking powder, 1 t lemon extract, 6 c flour.
Chill for 1-2 hours
Bake at 375 for 8 min (I do these thinly rolled with cookie cutter shapes)

+After cooling, this is the frosting, which, how my great grandma did it, went on the flat side (or what you’d think of as the back):

4 oz cream cheese
2 1/3 c powdered sugar
4 T butter
1 1/2 t vanilla

Soften cream cheese and butter in the microwave, add sugar and vanilla.
Then, of course, pretty sprinkles…”

Note: I found I bought the wrong lemon vial, so I used a combo of equal parts lemon flavor, rum, and lemon rind.

Okay, I confess, I only did the mixing and refrigerating (one batch with regular all purpose flour, the other with pamela’s gluten-free), my gluten-free friend did a lot of the rolling out, and chocolate friend did the frosting (more on chocolate friend in the 4th post). Thanks to Renee for her grandma’s recipe, and kudos to her grandma, who raised the woman who raised the woman I have been good friends with since college, who has always had a sage word in difficult times, and kept me in my sense of humor. Good luck on your Thanksgiving, Renee!

Today’s Cookie Recipe Rating:
Novelty Rating: 4 of 5 stars
I am familiar with sugar, and I’m familiar with cookies, but never any with sour and cream cheese..
Likelihood of Repeat: 65%
I definitely think this is worth trying again. More recent discussion with Renee has revealed that her mom only puts a thin layer of frosting on, which may explain the reviews from friends who said, “wow. that’s really sweet, I think I know some one who would like that..” Cookies pictured above were the gluten-free ones, which ended up with chocolate drizzles after we ran out of frosting. I am curious if it might be easier to roll out with more refrigeration after mixing so you can use cookie cutters, or if it’s just meant to be rolled into balls and flattened, definitely worth trying again to find out.