Tag Archives: spinach

Kelp Noodle Japchae – Low Carb Noodle-mania!

Okay folks, I admit, I’ve been a little distracted by the glorious Pacific Northwest summer, traipsing about in the mountains. Between that, work, and other personal projects, feeding the Internet Blog Machine has gotten a little backlogged. So without further ado, here’s one more..

 

Quite some time ago, I went to school in the other Washington -the District of Columbia. While there, I was exposed to the experience of an even more humid climate than my native Midwest summer. Wandering the concrete jungle blocks from my job at a nonprofit and nerd-exciting statistics classes, I was exposed to my first taste of Korean food ever. It was ironically a vegan Korean shop, and my favorite dish was tofu japchae. In retrospect it was an easy gateway crossover from my beloved childhood Cantonese restaurant dish of beef chow fun (see fellow pun lovers’ recipe at Woks of Life, and really, anything noodle. That first taste opened me up to a whole other cuisine full of spicier, more vegetable-filled and bbq-beef-laden meals like dolsot bibimbap and tofu soup!

Fast forward to years later on a warm Seattle summer day, living with some one who eats low carb, and here is my experiment in turning Japchae paleo friendly.

Japchae Ingredients
Japchae Ingredients

Continue Reading

Braised Coconut Spinach & Chickpeas w/Lemon

Back when I was killing time with my friend Torey spectating a Spartan Race in Vermont (a state worth visiting, by the way), I mentioned to her I was trying to eat more lean protein and that I’m really into chickpeas as one source. She mentioned a particular recipe, and even more impressively, remembered to email it to me later the next week once we were both back on our respective coasts. It’s a happy coincidence that the kitchn is one of my favored sources for recipes too, yay! I roasted a sweet potato the first time, and grossly underestimated the amount of time for that to finish baking in my toaster oven, so if you do the sweet potato, try starting that a bit early, or cut it up to help it cook. Note: there is no recipe directly in here for sweet potato, only a link.*

IMG_3732
The finished product, plus quinoa, steak (thanks, K_____!), and some leftover fries. Sorry vegetarians, I threw you one with this recipe and then featured it with meat..

Continue Reading

Sweet Potato Pesto Pasta

Thanks to Abby for loaning me a spiralizer so I could try it out!

Spiralizer!
Spiralizer!

Thanks to Fitnessista for this recipe combo, the proportions I made up from my trial.

Ingredients:
For the pesto:
1/2 cup raw shelled sunflower seeds
1 tsp garlic
1 cup spinach
1 cup (packed) fresh basil leaves
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoon goat cheese
Kosher salt

For the rest:
1 large yam, peeled
your protein add of choice (shown below are seared scallops, made the Alton Brown way).

Sunflower seed pesto - cheaper than trekking to Afghanistan to harvest your own pine nuts.
Sunflower seed pesto – cheaper than trekking to Afghanistan to harvest your own pine nuts.

Steps:
Purée sunflower seeds, garlic, spinach, basil, oil, goat cheese and lemon zest and juice until smooth. Season with salt. Thin pesto with water if too thick.
Cut off ends of sweet potato and install flush against spiralizer, spiralize to your heart’s content.
Boil sweet potato spirals in water no more than 3 minutes.
Combine with pesto.
Serve with blindfold on.

Peel, spiralize, clean spiralizer, boil.
Peel, spiralize, clean spiralizer, boil.

Today’s Recipe Rating:
Novelty Rating:
4 of 5 stars.
Extremely novel.
Likelihood of Repeat: 50%
I couldn’t get my ‘roommate’ to eat much of it, but I’d like to try it again -next time with the julienne blade of my food processor.
Lesson Learned: If you boil it too much the ‘pasta’ crumbles fast (similar risk with reheating). Yes, you could buy a single-purpose tool like a spiralizer if you think you’ll eat a lot of spiralized things every week, but a food processor might work just fine for a rare occasion. Also, I always forget how easy it is to make pesto, I need to do this more, especially since you can make cheaper versions without pine nuts! Yum! I have read that real sweet potatoes are more dense and jam up the machine, better stick with the soft orange ones –yams? Whatever they are called..

I ate this with seared scallops, but the color combo was still a little disconcerting..
I ate this with seared scallops, but the color combo was still a little disconcerting..

90% Home-made Pot Stickers

Home-made Pot Stickers (Photo: Yiling Wong)

Last week was the lunar new year. Happy year of the sheep pig, friends!

This recipe has been updated for lessons learned 2015-2019. Enjoy!

Skip to Recipe

My spouse and I had a few friends over to make and eat pot stickers. My parents used to do this when I was a kid, back in the day when frozen pot stickers were not readily available in Asian groceries in the Midwest. Making these on your own turns tedious and feels unrewarding fast, but getting a bunch of people together to take turns at it and eat them together is much more fun. Turns out when you get a handful of adult friends in on it, they get kind of competitive with the folding. We wrapped about twice as many as we were able to eat that night!

Sample folded dumpling.
Sample folded dumpling.

Without further ado, a recipe from my lifelong friend Jenny. It was nice that even though she couldn’t make it, her recipe was still there to help. Continue Reading

[Broccoli & Spinach] Miso Slaw

As a kid, my mom would make steamed broccoli, and my favorite parts to eat were the little slices of tender stalk (outside bark was peeled off) that she would steam along with the usual tree-like shapes I would stick in bowls of rice to create a tiny diorama before eating. It wasn’t until years later that I learned other people don’t necessarily consider the stalk worth even cooking.  I found this combo while searching for recipes to use up the giant quantity of miso I will have left over from another one that calls for only a few tablespoons.

Miso Slaw
From The Kitchn’s recipe.

Pretty green close-up, post-mixing.
Pretty green close-up, post-mixing.

Miso dressing
1/3 cup rice vinegar
3 tablespoons yellow or red miso (note: check labels to ensure specific gluten-freedness)
3 large garlic cloves, peeled
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons chopped fresh ginger
2 teaspoons sesame oil
2 teaspoons soy sauce
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup mayonnaise

Chop chop chop chop chop chop, chop chop, blend.
Chop chop chop chop chop chop, chop chop, blend.

Step 1: mix everything in a blender.

Salad ingredients
4 broccoli stalks, julienned into bite-sized pieces*
4 cups chopped spinach
1/2 cup finely chopped sliced almonds

Step 2: mix dressing and salad ingredients in a large bowl. Garnish with almonds and chill or serve.

Consumed on Day 1 with a side of brown rice and baked tilapia.
Consumed on Day 1 with a side of brown rice and baked tilapia.

Today’s Recipe Rating:
Novelty Rating: 4 of 5 stars.
This was astonishingly a salad I was both happy to eat, and that I thought was good for me, and the flavors only seemed to get better on day 2 and day 3.
Likelihood of Repeat: 20% See below.
Lesson Learned: Unfortunately, being the thrifty person I am, *I did not buy “Trader Joe’s broccoli slaw,” so the amount of time it took to shred broccoli stalk myself was maddening, and did not feel equal to the amount of slaw I got out of it. Still seems weird that Trader Joe’s would sell something people often might thing to throw away, or could get out of spare stalk, though..

Paleo Meatballs

On request of my ‘roommate,’ I tried this recipe from Easy Peasy, for paleo meatballs. It’s almost identical to the ones I usually make (which, by the way, get rave reviews by same roommate -beef, not turkey per the URL), except without breadcrumbs, a few more spices (oregano, basil), and added spinach. Never parsley. Boo parsley. It is only better than cilantro, which is the worst. Funny that anyone needs a paleo version of meatballs.. I followed the second option for directions that Angela mentioned: fry, then bake.

mince, mix, meld into balls, mmmmheat, and mmserve!
mince, mix, meld into balls, mmmmheat, and mmserve!

Paleo Meatballs

Ingredients:
1lb. grass fed ground beef
1 egg
1tsp garlic powder
1tsp paprika
salt and pepper to taste (about 1/2tsp salt and 1/4tsp pepper)
1/2 small onion, minced (I used minced red onion here)
1Tbsp spinach (optional)
1Tbsp fresh parsley (optional)

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
2. In a large bowl, scramble egg and combine remaining ingredients, mix.
3. Using a spoon, shape into meatballs. I tried for small ones, a little bigger than the diameter of a quarter. That’s the way I like my food portioned –meatballs, or cookies, or whatever.
4. The original recipe said that for a little crunch if you’re up for an extra step, heat a pan with about 1 Tbsp olive oil and brown on both sides, then bake 10-15 minutes until thoroughly cooked. This pan fry step made the house smell really tasty, plus, it led to..
5. Extra credit: sauté/ wilt some fresh vegetables in the remaining meaty-oil mix on the pan. I did this with spinach and a little minced garlic.

I served this with a side of barbecue sauce, a spring mix salad, garlic sautéed spinach, atop some leftover garlickified quinoa (see: fry up lots of minced garlic, add leftover cooked quinoa until warm), and atop some red rice I found in the back of the pantry. Of course, you could also eat it with pasta, or zucchini pasta, or just baked in barbecue sauce..

meatballs: not vegetarian.
meatballs: not vegetarian.

Today’s Trial Recipe Rating:
Novelty Rating: 2 of 5 stars
I may have never tried this exact rendition, but it sure did feel familiar.
Likelihood of Repeat: 40%
The other eater seemed to like them. It seems in the past that any time I make meatballs, no matter how much I tried to make extra, we didn’t end up with much left, so that’s a good sign. However, I still believe that the ones with breadcrumbs taste better, so I’ll probably only make these ones on specific request, or for my gluten-liberated friends. It might be worth trying without the spinach next time.

New standard review note!
Lesson Learned: Shaping meatballs always takes a little more time than you imagine, and don’t plan for leftovers.